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Rules for Vehicles Purchased Before January 1, 2009

Converted Vehicles

| Converting | EPA Certification | Getting Certified | Proof of Certification |

Taxpayers may claim a nonrefundable tax credit of fifty percent of the cost of equipment for conversion minus any grant received, up to $2,500 per vehicle registered in Utah if:

EPA Certification

Conversion must be EPA certified. Under R307-121-4 (6) and R307-121-5(7), the proof of certification required in 59-10-1009(1)(b) or 59-7-605(1)(b) refers to the copy of the EPA certification for the conversion. This means that the manufacturer of the conversion equipment must get the conversion equipment tested on your type of vehicle and supply you with a Certificate of Conformity indicating that the conversion conforms with EPA standards.

If a Certificate of Conformity is not available for your vehicle, testing is allowed by statute—subject to the criteria in 40 C.F.R. Part 86—to obtain an EPA Certificate of Conformity. Such tests must be performed at a special facility (some of which can be found in the EPA's Independent Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory Listing document).

In a letter dated February 3, 2006, the EPA provided information for small volume manufacturers who convert vehicles and engines to operate on alternative fuels. In another letter dated September 1, 2005, the EPA provided guidance for aftermarket alternative fuel converters on how to obtain EPA approval of the on-board diagnostics (OBD) II system. This guidance applies to converters who certify 2005 and later model year (MY) light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, medium-duty passenger vehicles, and 2007 and later MY heavy-duty vehicles. EPA also provided further guidance with its June 20, 2009 letter.

Proof of Certification

One way to obtain proof of certification that satisfies the requirements in 59-10-1009(1)(b) or 59-7-605(1)(b) is to request the EPA Certificate of Conformity from the manufacturer of the conversion equipment or from the vendor that sold and/or installed the conversion equipment.

Another option is to visit the EPA Website, then enter:

  1. the "Certificate of Conformity" in the first drop down list;
  2. "Light-Duty Vehicles and Trucks" in the second drop down list;
  3. the name of the vehicle or conversion company (e.g., Baytech, Technocarb, etc.) from the manufacturer drop down list; and then,
  4. select "Search," which should pull up the current certificates for each vehicle or conversion company.

Getting a Conversion Certified

Each year a growing number of vehicle engines can be fitted with EPA certified conversion equipment that will allow a vehicle to operate on natural gas or propane. These conversions typically are "engine specific." Conversions are subject to the criteria in 40 C.F.R. Part 86, which are EPA standards. Manufacturers of the conversion equipment would have to get the conversion equipment tested on your type of vehicle and supply you with a certificate that the conversion conforms with EPA standards, or you would need to get the test at a special facility (some of which can be found in the EPA's Independent Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory Listing document) and obtain a certificate of conformity. If you are a small volume manufacturer who converts vehicles and engines to operate on alternative fuels, the EPA provided information on how to get their conversions certified in a letter dated February 3, 2006.

In a letter dated September 1, 2005, the EPA provided guidance for aftermarket alternative fuel converters on how to obtain EPA approval of the on-board diagnostics (OBD) II system. This guidance applies to converters who certify 2005 and later model year (MY) light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles, and 2007 and later MY heavy-duty vehicles.

If a Certificate of Conformity is not available for your vehicle, testing is allowed by statute—subject to the criteria in 40 C.F.R. Part 86—to obtain an EPA Certificate of Conformity. Such tests must be performed at a special facility (some of which can be found in the EPA's Independent Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory Listing document).

Converting Vehicles

Information about converting vehicles to run on alternative fuels such as CNG, Propane, and Eletricity can be found on the following links:

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